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Dogfish News
11.19.2013

If you bellied up to a bar in 18th-century America on a winter’s eve, chances are the colonists on either side of you would be nursing a warm, spicy flip. The eggnog-type beer cocktail repeatedly appeared in the journals of the Founding Fathers and was a near constant on the expense accounts of George Washington.

But like powdered wigs and hoop skirts, flips fell out of fashion. Until now.

Here at Dogfish Head, we often look to the past for inspiration, and on Friday, Nov. 22, we’re releasing the first beer ever brewed specifically to make a flip beer cocktail. Why? We’re celebrating the grand opening of Eataly Chicago, the latest U.S. location of the epic artisanal Italian food emporium run by the Farinetti family, the Saper family, Mario Batali and Joe Bastianich.

11.11.2013

Dogfish Head Founder and President Sam Calagione first fell for artist Jon Langford’s work when he saw it on the walls of Chicago’s rock and beer emporium Delilah’s. Sam had been on the lookout for an artist to paint a label for Olde School Barleywine, and he knew he’d found his man. Since then, Jon – best known for his roles in the British punk band The Mekons and the Chicago-based country-punk band The Waco Brothers – has been called upon for all sorts of Dogfish Head projects, from Analog-A-Go-Go posters to labels for 75 Minute IPA and more. “It’s been a collaboration that I’ve enjoyed enormously,” says Jon. “Craft brewing reminds me of the early days of punk. I love the way that many of the brewers work together on berserk projects.”

10.28.2013

Have you ever heard a pear sing?

Here at Dogfish Head, we've been playing around with off-centered hybrids since the mid-90s. We do beer-wine hybrids like Noble Rot and Sixty-One using grapes as fermentable sugars, and we do a beer-cider hybrid called Positive Contact using apples.

For Piercing Pils, our new winter seasonal, we've brewed a beer/perry hybrid with pear juice. And although we usually prefer the spicy, robust possibilities of ales, this one is a Czech-style pilsner.

Hmmm. A winter seasonal that’s not dark and roasty? That’s right. Once again, Dogfish Head is zigging when everyone else is zagging, and we think you’ll love it.

10.16.2013

We're entering the home stretch of our year-long Province Ale Company, but we're not slowing down yet. This month, we're brewing Scurvy Grass Ale. it's a tonic ale brewed with molasses, Czech malt and hops. Brewer Ragged Jordan (aka Ben Potts) has spiced things up with scurvy grass, senna leaf and horseradish. What's scurvy grass, you ask? It's a peppery perennial from the cabbage family that's rich in vitamin C. Sailors of yore used to eat it after returning from long voyages. It was a life-saver!

In the kitchen, Chef Joseph Arsenault (aka Dennis Marcoux), has whipped up a Roasted Pumpkin and Israeli Cous-Cous Salad with Homemade Duck Pastrami. Mmm, three cheers for Chef Joseph!

This throwback combo will be tapped and served Saturday at Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats in Rehoboth Beach. And don't worry if you missed last month's beer. We held back a keg so members and newcomers can catch up and join the run of antique ales.

Just two more months to go! Remember, at the end of the year, investors will receive their completed journal, as well as a turn-of-the-century Province Ale baseball cap and a retro T-shirt. Also, anyone who can guess which two of the 12 recipes were invented by the Province team – and not real 19th-century beer recipes discovered on the dusty shelves of a local library – will enjoy a private dinner with the Ragged, Chef Joseph and Nicolo Mastroianni (aka Sam Calagione).

10.15.2013

You know we love beer, right? Well, there are three other things hot on beer's heels around here: the arts, community and the environment.

If your Sussex County nonprofit works in any of those three spaces, we're throwing down a challenge for you: Tell us your mission and how you do what you, and we just might give you $4,000 to work with.

"There are so many good people doing so many good things here in Sussex," says Mark Carter, Dogfish Head's Beer & Benevolence guru. "Most of our co-workers live and play here, and the local community has been super supportive of our brewery, so it makes sense to return the favor."

We'll be giving out three awards – one for each category – for $3,000 each. The three beneficiaries also will receive a "Benevolence Night" at Dogfish Head Brewings & Eats in Rehoboth Beach, Del., and the nonprofit with the best turnout will receive an additional $1,000.

10.14.2013

Over the next few weeks, the tart and complex Ancient Ale Kvasir will be hitting taps and shelves.

The recipe for Kvasir (say va-SEER) was developed with the help of chemical, botanical and pollen evidence taken from a 3,500-year-old Danish drinking vessel. The vessel, made of birch bark, was found in the tomb of a leather-clad dancer or priestess.

"Last year, we brewed an Ancient Ale from southern Europe," says Dogfish Head Founder and President Sam Calagione, "so it's been interesting to see the differences driven by the Scandinavian climate and terroir."

10.08.2013

American Beauty, the counterculture collaboration between Dogfish Head Craft Brewery and the Grateful Dead, will be hitting taps and shelves over the next few weeks.

The band took the lead on deciding the style of beer, and they opted for a bold pale ale made with 100 percent U.S.-grown ingredients. The brewery and the band, who both built followings by connecting directly with their fans, asked their supporters to help decide on one righteous, off-centered ingredient to add to the recipe that would complement the pale ale base.

More than 1,500 loyal fans suggested an ingredient idea and the Dead-inspired story behind it. There was no shortage of great suggestions – the red grenadine from “Brown-Eyed Women,” rose hips reminiscent of the motif painted on the Rosemont water tower – but there was one that stood out.

10.07.2013

In a perfect world, we'd package a batch of beer one day, and the next day it would appear on taps and shelves in all 27 states where our off-centered ales are sold.

But if you've ever hunted for a highly sought-after beer from Dogfish Head or any other small, independent brewery, you know we don't live in that perfect world.

Take our fall seasonal, Punkin Ale. We release Punkin every year on Labor Day weekend. We're in coastal Delaware, and that's the unofficial end of summer around here, so that just feels right. Any earlier would give us that feeling you get when you start seeing Santa in September.

So if you come to our Milton brewery or Rehoboth Beach brewpub on Labor Day weekend, you'll find Punkin Ale on our taps and shelves. Easy-peasy.

The rest of our distribution footprint? Well, that's a little trickier.

09.24.2013

We've heard a lot of chatter and gotten a few questions today about a trademark dispute involving our Belgian-style white beer Namaste.

For more than five years, we’ve sold Namaste throughout the U.S. We originally brewed it to raise funds for Drie Fonteinen brewery after a disaster hit and ruined 100,000 bottles of their beer. To reflect this spirit of collaboration and respect for the brewing industry, we named the beer Namaste. What started as a fundraiser quickly became a fan favorite, and we’ve been brewing and bottling it ever since.

A few months ago, a retail account and restaurant in Austin, Texas, began brewing under the name Namaste Brewing Company. The brewery owners also run a retail store that has sold Dogfish Head, including our Namaste beer. As many of you are probably aware, there is no point in having a trademark unless we actively defend it (and if we don’t defend it this time, anyone can name a beer Namaste), and Dogfish does have a federal trademark for Namaste in the beer world, which covers both breweries and beer.

Because we believe in working collaboratively with other brewers in handling these disputes, we have called and emailed Namaste Brewing in hopes of resolving the matter brewer-to-brewer. (We have not sent a cease-and-desist and have not taken any legal action, as has been reported.) We have given them several creative solutions in an effort to alleviate any hardship they might face in making the changes, including the option to continue to sell the beer at their existing location and at festivals. Another option was to allow them ample time to phase out the name.

We want to point out a quick distinction, as we’ve seen some of our fans point to Sam’s trademark troubles in the past, as seen on "Beer Wars." Our issue in "Beer Wars" with Punkin Ale was actually quite different from the one here. Back then, the company that tried to block our trademark application for Punkin Ale was arguing that Punkin Ale was not a distinct enough name for a beer. They did not have a trademark they were trying to protect, and we did not brew a beer or open a company with a name similar to theirs. With Namaste, we have to protect the name of our beer or we lose it.

That's all we plan to say publicly about this, and we're looking forward to a friendly solution with the folks at Whip-In.

09.20.2013

Here at Dogfish Head, we have places to eat, places to drink and places to play. The missing link? A place to stay.

We're fixin' to change that. In late spring of 2014, the 16-room Dogfish Inn will open in downtown Lewes, Del., at what is now the Vesuvio Motel.

Every year, hundreds of thousands of craft beer fans from around the world make a pilgrimage to Dogfish Head’s coastal Delaware brewpub and brewery. For nearly a decade, we've helped host some of these folks at the Dogfish Head Brewmaster's Suite at the lovely Inn at Canal Square. Our migration a few boat-lengths down the canal will give us a bigger home base dedicated to exploring all of the off-centered opportunities in this beautiful part of the state.

 
 
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